Monday, January 4, 2010

VIDEO EDITOR URGENTLY NEEDED FOR UTOPIAN ROAD MOVIE

VIDEO EDITOR NEEDED FOR UTOPIAN ROAD MOVIE
 
THE LABORATORY OF INSURRECTIONARY IMAGINATION ( www.labofii.net) is looking for an experienced editor to finish the film part of it's  Paths Through Utopias project (www.utopias.eu).
 
The Lab of ii:
 
Infamous for fermenting mass prayers to consumption in shopping malls, touring the UK recruiting a rebel clown army, running courses in postcapitalist culture, throwing snowballs at bankers, launching a rebel raft regatta to shut down a coal fired power station and falling in love with utopias, The Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination (Lab of ii) is not an institution or a group, not a network or an NGO, but an affinity of friends who recognise the beauty of collective disobedience and the role of culture in radical social change. We treat insurrection as an art and art as a means of preparing for the coming insurrection. (www.labofii.net). The Lab is presently based in London, UK.
 
 
The project:
 
Paths Through Utopias took us on a 7 month journey (2007-8) across Europe in search of ways of living despite capitalism, visiting numerous alternative communities ranging from a permaculture settlement to an occupied factory, a free love commune to Climate Camp. From this journey we are publishing a book/film, a book which comes packaged with a film within it. The book/film will initially be published in France by La Decouverte (http://www.editionsladecouverte.fr/) in autumn 2010 and later in the UK. It will also be toured in 2011.
 
Whilst the book is a piece of travel writing about the experience the film is a documentary fiction in the form of a post crash road movie, shot in the places visited but set in the future. The book and the film are seen as a dialogue between present and future, fact and imagination.
 
The film is especially influenced by William Morris' 19th Century novel a vision of a post-capitalist decentralised ecological Utopia, News from Nowhere. This classic of Utopian literature is a sumptuous journey which propels us into an imagined future; a future which, thanks to the richness of its description, feels as actual and possible as the present. In this spirit, the film takes the form of a "fake" documentary exploring a fictional era following a global ecological-economic collapse.  It describes a post capitalist/oil age Europe, and proposes the existence of a decentralised autonomous society that has slowly evolved out of the ruins of a systemic crash.
 
Shot in the actual places and communities visited with characters living there, playing themselves, the film shows these places as projects that have survived a collapse, thanks to their self sufficiency and autonomy from market systems, and portrays these contemporary "Utopias" as "normal" rather than "alternative" ways of living. We have are not follow traditional documentary genres; our references can be found in the more experimental work of Agnès Varda (The Gleaners), Patrick Keiler (Robinson in Space), Andrew Kotting (Gallivant) Chris Marker (L'Ambassade) or Robert Kramer (Route One).
 
The Job:
 
A years worth of work - logging, transcribing, translating and writing has already taken place on the film. Unfortunately our editor fell seriously ill and is now unable to continue working on the project. We are looking for someone who can pick up where we left off but who is also able to add their creativity into the project and take it to completion in July 2010.
 
Ideally you are someone who has good experience editing feature length film/video, and have worked in both genres of documentary and fiction. You are open to experimental forms of film, collective working methods and share our anti-capitalist politics.
 
Experienced in Final Cut Pro is required. If you can speak Spanish and/or French this is an added bonus as parts of the film are in these languages.
 
The Lab is based in Bethnal Green London you can work from there or at a location of your choosing. The deadline is very tight and so we are looking for someone who can begin in February (ish) and work to the deadline of July. We can offer a modest fee of £2000.
 
You will be mostly working with artistsactivist John Jordan but will also occasionally with activistresearcher Isa Fremeuax and composer/sound artist Isa Suarez (http://www.isasuarez.com/).
 
How to apply:
 
Please email us a cover letter stating why you are interested, what experience you have and when you can begin work on the project. Enclose a CV with the letter and links to past work/ show reels etc. ( if you wish to send a DVD send it to JJ,  110 Teesdale St, London E2 6PU.) Please include one reference from a recent relevant job.
 
Email your application to john@labofii.net by Sunday 17th January 5pm deadline for application. There will be an informal meeting with appropriate applicants and we will be able to inform you of our decision by Monday 25th of January.


Finally here are a few stills from the film to give you a taste: 


 

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""Politics is not solely, or even primarily, about reasoned thinking and rational choices; it's an affair of fantasy and desire. People are rarely moved to action, support, or even consent by realistic proposals; they are motivated by dreams of what could be."





VIDEO EDITOR URGENTLY NEEDED FOR UTOPIAN ROAD MOVIE

 
THE LABORATORY OF INSURRECTIONARY IMAGINATION ( www.labofii.net) is looking for an experienced editor to finish the film part of it's  Paths Through Utopias project (www.utopias.eu).
 
The Lab of ii:
 
Infamous for fermenting mass prayers to consumption in shopping malls, touring the UK recruiting a rebel clown army, running courses in postcapitalist culture, throwing snowballs at bankers, launching a rebel raft regatta to shut down a coal fired power station and falling in love with utopias, The Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination (Lab of ii) is not an institution or a group, not a network or an NGO, but an affinity of friends who recognise the beauty of collective disobedience and the role of culture in radical social change. We treat insurrection as an art and art as a means of preparing for the coming insurrection. (www.labofii.net). The Lab is presently based in London, UK.
 
 
The project:
 
Paths Through Utopias took us on a 7 month journey (2007-8) across Europe in search of ways of living despite capitalism, visiting numerous alternative communities ranging from a permaculture settlement to an occupied factory, a free love commune to Climate Camp. From this journey we are publishing a book/film, a book which comes packaged with a film within it. The book/film will initially be published in France by La Decouverte (http://www.editionsladecouverte.fr/) in autumn 2010 and later in the UK. It will also be toured in 2011.
 
Whilst the book is a piece of travel writing about the experience the film is a documentary fiction in the form of a post crash road movie, shot in the places visited but set in the future. The book and the film are seen as a dialogue between present and future, fact and imagination.
 
The film is especially influenced by William Morris' 19th Century novel a vision of a post-capitalist decentralised ecological Utopia, News from Nowhere. This classic of Utopian literature is a sumptuous journey which propels us into an imagined future; a future which, thanks to the richness of its description, feels as actual and possible as the present. In this spirit, the film takes the form of a "fake" documentary exploring a fictional era following a global ecological-economic collapse.  It describes a post capitalist/oil age Europe, and proposes the existence of a decentralised autonomous society that has slowly evolved out of the ruins of a systemic crash.
 
Shot in the actual places and communities visited with characters living there, playing themselves, the film shows these places as projects that have survived a collapse, thanks to their self sufficiency and autonomy from market systems, and portrays these contemporary "Utopias" as "normal" rather than "alternative" ways of living. We have are not follow traditional documentary genres; our references can be found in the more experimental work of Agnès Varda (The Gleaners), Patrick Keiler (Robinson in Space), Andrew Kotting (Gallivant) Chris Marker (L'Ambassade) or Robert Kramer (Route One).
 
The Job:
 
A years worth of work - logging, transcribing, translating and writing has already taken place on the film. Unfortunately our editor fell seriously ill and is now unable to continue working on the project. We are looking for someone who can pick up where we left off but who is also able to add their creativity into the project and take it to completion in July 2010.
 
Ideally you are someone who has good experience editing feature length film/video, and have worked in both genres of documentary and fiction. You are open to experimental forms of film, collective working methods and share our anti-capitalist politics.
 
Experienced in Final Cut Pro is required. If you can speak Spanish and/or French this is an added bonus as parts of the film are in these languages.
 
The Lab is based in Bethnal Green London you can work from there or at a location of your choosing. The deadline is very tight and so we are looking for someone who can begin in February (ish) and work to the deadline of July. We can offer a modest fee of £2000.
 
You will be mostly working with artistsactivist John Jordan but will also occasionally with activistresearcher Isa Fremeuax and composer/sound artist Isa Suarez (http://www.isasuarez.com/).
 
How to apply:
 
Please email us a cover letter stating why you are interested, what experience you have and when you can begin work on the project. Enclose a CV with the letter and links to past work/ show reels etc. ( if you wish to send a DVD send it to JJ,  110 Teesdale St, London E2 6PU.) Please include one reference from a recent relevant job.
 
Email your application to john@labofii.net by Monday 18th January 5pm deadline for application. There will be an informal meeting with appropriate applicants and we will be able to inform you of our decision by Monday 25th of January.
 

Wednesday, November 18, 2009

Insurrectionary imagination needed


The Bike Bloc installation is up and running in the Arnolfini gallery..We need your drawings and ideas, your insurrectionary imagination of what a bike bloc would look like and how it could contribute to the Reclaim Power action taking over the UN COP15 conference for a peoples summit. If your in Bristol pin them on the wall - if not send them to us at john@labofii.net and we will put them up ready for next weeks workshops... for more information see: 

www.funbetweenyourlegs.info 

and 

http://www.arnolfini.org.uk/whatson/events/details/537


Thursday, November 12, 2009

'Copenhagen: Seattle Grows Up' from The Nation

Naomi Klein on copenhagen, CJA, carbon markets, bike blocs and 10 years after seattle ....


   Copenhagen: Seattle Grows Up 
   by Naomi Klein


The other day I received a pre-publication copy of The
Battle of the Story of the Battle of Seattle, by David Solnit
and Rebecca Solnit. It's set to come out ten years after a historic
coalition of activists shut down the World Trade Organization summit in
Seattle, the spark that ignited a global anticorporate movement. 

 The book is a fascinating account of what really happened in
Seattle, but when I spoke to David Solnit, the direct-action guru who
helped engineer the shutdown, I found him less interested in reminiscing
about 1999 than in talking about the upcoming United Nations climate
change summit in Copenhagen and the "climate justice" actions he is
helping to organize across the United States on November 30. "This is
definitely a Seattle-type moment," Solnit told me. "People are ready to
throw down." 

 There is certainly a Seattle quality to the Copenhagen mobilization:
the huge range of
groups that will be there; the diverse tactics that will be on
display; and the developing-country governments ready to bring activist
demands into the summit. But Copenhagen is not merely a Seattle do-over.
It feels, instead, as though the progressive tectonic plates are
shifting, creating a movement that builds on the strengths of an earlier
era but also learns from its mistakes. 

 The big criticism of the movement the media insisted on calling
"antiglobalization" was always that it had a laundry list of grievances
and few concrete alternatives. The movement converging on Copenhagen, in
contrast, is about a single issue--climate change--but it weaves a
coherent narrative about its cause, and its cures, that incorporates
virtually every issue on the planet. In this narrative, our climate is
changing not simply because of particular polluting practices but
because of the underlying logic of capitalism, which values short-term
profit and perpetual growth above all else. Our governments would have
us believe that the same logic can now be harnessed to solve the climate
crisis--by creating a tradable commodity called "carbon" and by
transforming forests and farmland into "sinks" that will supposedly
offset our runaway emissions. 

 Climate-justice activists in Copenhagen will argue that, far from
solving the climate crisis, carbon-trading represents an unprecedented
privatization of the atmosphere, and that offsets and sinks threaten to
become a resource grab of colonial proportions. Not only will these
"market-based solutions" fail to solve the climate crisis, but this
failure will dramatically deepen poverty and inequality, because the
poorest and most vulnerable people are the primary victims of climate
change--as well as the primary guinea pigs for these emissions-trading
schemes. 

 But activists in Copenhagen won't simply say no to all this. They
will aggressively advance solutions that simultaneously reduce emissions
and narrow inequality. Unlike at previous summits, where alternatives
seemed like an afterthought, in Copenhagen the alternatives will take
center stage. For instance, the direct-action coalition Climate Justice Action
has called on activists to storm the conference center on December 16. Many will do this as part of the "bike bloc," riding together
on an as yet unrevealed "irresistible new machine of resistance" made up
of hundreds of old bicycles. The goal of the action is not to shut down
the summit, Seattle-style, but to open it up, transforming it into "a
space to talk about our agenda, an agenda from below, an agenda
of climate justice, of real solutions against their false ones.... This
day will be ours." 

 Some of the solutions on offer from the activist camp are the same
ones the global justice movement has been championing for years: local,
sustainable agriculture; smaller, decentralized power projects; respect
for indigenous land rights; leaving fossil fuels in the ground;
loosening protections on green technology; and paying for these
transformations by taxing financial transactions and canceling foreign
debts. Some solutions are new, like the mounting demand that rich
countries pay 
"climate debt" reparations to the poor. These are tall orders, but
we have all just seen the kind of resources our governments can marshal
when it comes to saving the elites. As one pre-Copenhagen slogan puts
it: "If the climate were a bank, it would have been saved"--not
abandoned to the brutality of the market. 

 In addition to the coherent narrative and the focus on alternatives,
there are plenty of other changes too: a more thoughtful approach to
direct action, one that recognizes the urgency to do more than just talk
but is determined not to play into the tired scripts of
cops-versus-protesters. "Our action is one of civil disobedience," say
the organizers of the December 16 action. "We will overcome any physical
barriers that stand in our way--but we will not respond with violence if
the police [try] to escalate the situation." (That said, there is no way
the two-week summit will not include a few running battles between cops
and kids in black; this is Europe, after all.) 

 A decade ago, in an op-ed in the New York Times published
after Seattle was shut down, I wrote that a new movement advocating a
radically different form of globalization "just had its coming-out
party." What will be the significance of Copenhagen? I put that question
to John Jordan, whose prediction of what eventually happened in Seattle
I quoted in my book No Logo. He replied: "If Seattle was the
movement of movements' coming-out party, then maybe Copenhagen will be a
celebration of our coming of age." 

 He cautions, however, that growing up doesn't mean playing it safe,
eschewing civil disobedience in favor of staid meetings. "I hope we have
grown up to become much more disobedient," Jordan said, "because life on
this world of ours may well be terminated because of too many acts of
obedience." 

Friday, November 6, 2009

Call for proposals for “…Louder than Bombs”: Art, Action & Activism

CALL FOR ARTISTS 

"…Louder than Bombs": Art, Action & Activism 

STANLEY PICKER GALLERY & LIVE ART DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

Over the course of seven weeks in February/March 2010, the Stanley Picker Gallery at Kingston University, will hand over its entire exhibition space to host a series of week-long residencies entitled "…Louder than Bombs": Art, Action & Activism.

Co-curated with Live Art Development Agency, London, "…Louder than Bombs": Art, Action & Activism will focus on challenging social/political/global issues addressed through seven invited artist/activist's individual working practices and the Gallery audience's direct participation and responding involvement through an integrated programme of public workshops and live events. 

Its title borrowed from a compilation album by 80's anti-establishment beaus The Smiths (in turn borrowed from Elizabeth Smart's extended prose poem By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept), "…Louder than Bombs" invites seven artists, artist-activists, or artist-groups for a series of weekly occupancies to deliver work that expresses their creative response around a chosen issue. The issues addressed by the programme of activities will include a range of political, ecological, social and personal causes, as to be defined by the seven participating individuals and groups. The programme will provide each participating artist/group with the space, resources and supportive environment for their work to be developed over an intensive five-day period. During their week-long residency each participant will be required to deliver at least one participatory workshop and a public event/s. The entire programme will recorded through photographic documentation and a concluding interview with each participant, that will aim to reflect critically upon their direct involvement in the overall programme. 

In addition to the above, one of the seven invited projects will be developed to engage directly with a local primary school, in order to pilot the introduction of performative practice into the classroom.

"…Louder than Bombs" Art, Action & Activism has been developed as an extended element of an ongoing collaborative research project entitled The Art of Intervention: The Intersections of Public and Private Memory between Kingston University, London and Kyoto Seika University, Japan. 

To propose your participation in the "…Louder than Bombs" Art, Action & Activism programme please provide the following information:

  • A statement (maximum 1,000 words) outlining your chosen issue and describing how you would envisage developing and delivering your proposed workshop activity and public event, including an initial indication of the resources, equipment and materials you may require for your activity. You may want to suggest targeting your activities at particular audience sectors or age groups. Only if appropriate to your practice, please state in what ways your activity would also be suitable for a pilot project aimed at primary school pupils.

  • A CV including up to 5 web-references to view online examples and/or documentation of your practice to date.

Please email your proposals to picker@kingston.ac.uk by Midday on Friday 4th December.

Selected applicants will be notified by Friday 18th December with a view to commencing preparations for their period of residency in January 2010. 

All participating individuals/groups will receive a fixed-fee and expenses for their involvement in the overall programme. Additional funds will be made available for the associated schools programme.


Tuesday, November 3, 2009

PUT THE FUN BETWEEN YOUR LEGS: Become the Bike Bloc

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

THE BIKE BLOCK FINDS THE PERFECT PLACE !

Dear friends who have been working to find us space in Copenhagen, there is great news, we have somewhere and it is so much nicer than the grey church of contemporary art !! Between the 5th-19th of December we will be based in an  abandoned petrol station taken over  by a great crew of artist, Free International Tankstelle (http://www.f-i-t.org/) it's  at Farumgade 4-6, Nørrebro, Kopenhagen. What is extraordinary, is that they already have 100 bikes for us to use! Which is a good start (although we will probably need more and there are people from cultura 21 who have offered to help with this already which is great.) 

So, we will reclaim the autonomy of art within the old ruins of last century's empire of  fossil fuels..a perfect place to build and launch a bike bloc. As for the Nikolaj centre for contemporary art, we should just remember  Martin Luther Kings poignant words  "In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends."  Thank you for being friends who walk the talk. Thanks for all the help and contacts you have been sending and lets keep in touch and prepare to put the fun between our legs..

See you in Bristol or/and copenhagen ?